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Media Sources Guide

TOPIC: Infectious DiseasesClear

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Charles L. Bailey

Executive Director of George Mason University’s Biomedical Research Laboratory and Distinguished Professor of Biology

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Expertise: Biodefense, Infectious Diseases, Biomarkers

As director of Mason’s Biomedical Research Laboratory (BRL), Bailey has overseen the five-year building project that began in 2005 when Mason was awarded a $27.7 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Prior to joining Mason, Bailey served as commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases where he led medical and scientific research programs dedicated to the development of new forms of medical protection against biological weapons and other infectious diseases. The results of his hands-on experiments with a wide variety of infectious agents have been published in more than 100 scientific articles in refereed books and journals. He has also presented at national and international conferences and to U.S. government officials, and served previously as a senior analyst with the Defense Intelligence Agency. Bailey holds a doctorate from Oklahoma State University.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Calvin B. Carpenter

Deputy Director of George Mason University’s Biomedical Research Laboratory and Research Professor

Expertise: Biodefense, Infectious Diseases

Carpenter is a veterinarian with more than 26 years of military experience and over sixteen years of infectious disease and biodefense research experience. Prior to joining Mason, he served as the chief of the Medical Science and Technology Division in the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the deputy director for Grants Management at the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs and program manager for the Department of Defense’s Prion, Muscular Dystrophy and Hepatitis C Research Programs. Carpenter is a member of the American Association of Laboratory Animal Science, the American Veterinary Medical Association, and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. He is a graduate of Command and General Staff College and has been awarded the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal, the Army Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Armed Forces Reserve Medal. He holds a doctor of veterinary medicine degree from Oklahoma State University and is board certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Kathryn H. Jacobsen

Assistant Professor

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Expertise: Infectious Diseases, Germs, Pandemics, Public Health, Epidemiology, Global Health

Jacobsen is an assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Services’ Department of Global and Community Health. She teaches courses in epidemiology and international health, and is an expert in infectious diseases and how diseases spread. Her research seeks to better understand the health effects of economic and infrastructural development using a diverse range of epidemiologic methods, including the development of mathematical models of infectious disease transmission and field research. Jacobsen can speak about the spread of germs and about the specific risks one faces when traveling, using bathrooms, hotels, etc. She has worked with collaborators in Africa and South America designing, conducting, and analyzing program evaluations and studies of infectious disease epidemiology, and is the author of the textbook, Introduction to Global Health.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Serguei Popov

Research Professor, National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases

Expertise: Bioweapons, Biodefense, Infectious Diseases

Popov is a professor at Mason's National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. He specializes in biodefense research including the development of new treatment approaches against anthrax. He is a former Soviet microbiologist who can speak about the Soviet bioweapons program. Popov's findings have been widely published in scientific journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, BMC Infectious Diseases, Cellular Microbiology and Nonproliferation Review.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Anne Taylor

Director of Operations of George Mason University’s Biomedical Research Laboratory

Expertise: Biodefense, Infectious Diseases

As the director of operations for the BRL, Taylor oversees the implementation of standard operating procedures at the facility. She previously served as the technical operations manager for Mason’s National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. Prior to joining Mason, Taylor held positions as a scientist at Advanced Biosystems and a biology program manager at the Federal Bureau of Investigations. She also worked as a research assistant at both the Walter Reed Army Medical Research Institute and the Naval Medical Research Institute’s Henry M. Jackson Foundation during which time she deployed on national and international biological warfare detection missions including the United Nations Special Commission to Iraq. Taylor trained at the Porton Down Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research, in Salisbury, England. She holds a bachelor of science degree in biology from The American University and a master’s degree in biodefense from Mason.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Yuntao Wu

Professor, Molecular and Microbiology

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Expertise: AIDS, HIV, Virology, Infectious Diseases

Wu, assistant professor in the College of Science’s Molecular and Microbiology Department, has spent the last six years decoding the molecular processes of the AIDS virus. AIDS, a devastating disease that is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), affected more than 33 million people worldwide in 2007, according to World Health Organization statistics. A widely published researcher whose work has appeared in prestigious scientific journals such as Science, Journal of Virology, Virology, Retrovirology and Current HIV Research, Wu believes that a solution to the AIDS epidemic is possible. The 2009 NYCDC AIDS Ride (http://nycdc.org), which takes place in September, will support the next stage of Dr. Wu's research which has the potential to stop the HIV virus from becoming AIDS. Wu earned a doctorate in virology in 1998 from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, after spending four years studying the DNA replication of the baculovirus family — a group of viruses that are fatal to insects and are often used for nonchemical pest control. He subsequently served for four years as a research fellow at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) where he began examining HIV infection in humans prior to joining Mason’s faculty in 2003. Wu has been the recipient of many awards and honors including the 2007 "Tomorrow's PIs" by Genome Technology Magazine, the 2006 Siemens Mentor Award by the Siemens Foundation, and the 2003 NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence by NIH. His research interests include HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells and lentiviral vector development for targeting HIV infection.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu