Media and Public Relations

Where Innovation Is Tradition

Media Sources Guide

CATEGORY: ScienceClear

Science: Sub-Categories:

Photo of Expert

Lance A. Liotta

University Professor and Co-director, Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine

Web Site

Expertise: Health Care, Cancer, Nanotechnology, Bioengineering, Proteomics, Biomarkers

One of the first scientists to investigate the process of tumor invasion and metastasis at the molecular level, Liotta has invented technologies in the fields of diagnostics, immunoassays, microdissection, and proteomics that have been used to make broad discoveries in genomics, functional genetics, and tissue proteomics. Prior to joining George Mason University, he served as chief of the Laboratory of Pathology at the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research and as deputy director for Intramural Research at the National Institutes of Health. Liotta earned a medical degree and a doctoral degree in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. His research contributions have generated 90 issued patents and more than 600 articles in peer-reviewed publications. Included among Liotta’s numerous awards for cancer research are three Public Health Service Commissioned Corps medals, the Arthur S. Fleming Award, the Warner Lambert/Parke Davis Award, the Rhoads Memorial Award, the Milken Family Foundation Award for Basic Research, the Lila Gruber Cancer Research Award, the U.S. Surgeon General’s Medallion, and the Maud L. Menten Lecture Award. In addition, he is the recipient of the National Institutes of Health Award of Merit, the Cotlove Research Award, the Ballantyne Distinguished Lectureship Research Award, and the Philip Levine Award for Outstanding Research.

Liotta and Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine Co-director Emanuel F. Petricoin III, who are internationally recognized for their pioneering research in proteomics and molecular medicine, co-founded the George Mason University Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine in 2005. They currently are exploring their recent discovery of an archive of protein fragments in the blood that are biomarker candidates for breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Their immediate goals are to validate these potential biomarkers in clinical trials to determine their feasibility in the diagnosis of cancer prior to metastasis, and to analyze molecular pathways in diseased tissue to determine individualized and targeted treatments for patients. The team also is investigating the development and use of nanotechnology to synergize with proteomic tools for new types of biosensors, nanoparticles for biomarker discovery, and nanoelectronics. Liotta and Petricoin have more than 20 patents pending in the areas of cancer theranostics, biomarkers, and related technologies.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Photo of Expert

Emanuel "Chip" Petricoin III

University Professor and Co-director, Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine

Web Site

Expertise: Health Care, Cancer, Nanotechnology, Proteomics, Biomarkers

A renowned proteomics and cell signaling expert, Petricoin came to George Mason University from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, where he served as a senior investigator. His expertise also includes drug and biologic effects on signal transduction and kinase-driven cascades, diagnostic platform development, pathogenic microbiology, and artificial intelligence-based bioinformatics tools.

Petricoin holds a doctorate in microbiology from the University of Maryland at College Park. He serves on numerous editorial boards, has co-written more than 170 articles for peer-reviewed publications, and is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Petricoin and Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine Co-director Lance A. Liotta, who are internationally recognized for their pioneering research in proteomics and molecular medicine, co-founded the George Mason University Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine in 2005. They currently are exploring their recent discovery of an archive of protein fragments in the blood that are biomarker candidates for breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Their immediate goals are to validate these potential biomarkers in clinical trials to determine their feasibility in the diagnosis of cancer prior to metastasis, and to analyze molecular pathways in diseased tissue to determine individualized and targeted treatments for patients. The team also is investigating the development and use of nanotechnology to synergize with proteomic tools for new types of biosensors, nanoparticles for biomarker discovery, and nanoelectronics. Liotta and Petricoin have more than 20 patents pending in the areas of cancer theranostics, biomarkers, and related technologies.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Serguei Popov

Research Professor, National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases

Expertise: Bioweapons, Biodefense, Infectious Diseases

Popov is a professor at Mason's National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. He specializes in biodefense research including the development of new treatment approaches against anthrax. He is a former Soviet microbiologist who can speak about the Soviet bioweapons program. Popov's findings have been widely published in scientific journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, BMC Infectious Diseases, Cellular Microbiology and Nonproliferation Review.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

William Sommers

Director, EastFIRE Laboratory

Expertise: forest fires, forest fire management, forest fire prevention, climate sciences, ecosystems, ecological risk assessment, sustainable development

Dr. William Sommers, director of the EastFIRE Laboratory at George Mason University, studies the impacts of climate change on global fire while focusing on wildfires in the eastern U.S.

Sommers is a 30-year veteran of the U.S. Forest Service and from 1986-2000 served as its director of Forest Fire and Atmospheric Sciences Research. A trained meteorologist, Sommers is an expert on the unique environmental and monetary challenges of wildfire prevention, prediction and management in different regions of the country.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Anne Taylor

Director of Operations of George Mason University’s Biomedical Research Laboratory

Expertise: Biodefense, Infectious Diseases

As the director of operations for the BRL, Taylor oversees the implementation of standard operating procedures at the facility. She previously served as the technical operations manager for Mason’s National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. Prior to joining Mason, Taylor held positions as a scientist at Advanced Biosystems and a biology program manager at the Federal Bureau of Investigations. She also worked as a research assistant at both the Walter Reed Army Medical Research Institute and the Naval Medical Research Institute’s Henry M. Jackson Foundation during which time she deployed on national and international biological warfare detection missions including the United Nations Special Commission to Iraq. Taylor trained at the Porton Down Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research, in Salisbury, England. She holds a bachelor of science degree in biology from The American University and a master’s degree in biodefense from Mason.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

James Trefil

Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Physics

Expertise: Science Literacy, Teaching Science to Nonscientists

James Trefil writes extensively for general audiences and is known for his interest in teaching science to nonscientists. He cowrote "The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy" (Houghton Mifflin, 1998). "Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy" (Cassell, 1991) and "The Sciences: An Integrated Approach" (Wiley, 1995) were cowritten with Robert Hazen, Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Earth Sciences at Mason. Trefil also wrote "Other Worlds: The Solar System and Beyond," a National Geographic Society publication.

 

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Mark Uhen

Assistant Term Professor, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences

Expertise: Oceanic Science, Environment, Marine Mammals, Geology

Mark Uhen is a geologist and an expert in the evolution of cetaceans and other marine mammals. He looks at changes in the diversity of whale species and how they correlate with the evolution and diversification of diatoms, tiny, abundant algae that live in the ocean. Uhen also looks at the ways that fossil diversity is affected by global changes.

He is interested in how the body size of whales changes over time, and how whales became the largest living organisms in the world.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Photo of Expert

Yuntao Wu

Professor, Molecular and Microbiology

Web Site

Expertise: AIDS, HIV, Virology, Infectious Diseases

Wu, assistant professor in the College of Science’s Molecular and Microbiology Department, has spent the last six years decoding the molecular processes of the AIDS virus. AIDS, a devastating disease that is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), affected more than 33 million people worldwide in 2007, according to World Health Organization statistics. A widely published researcher whose work has appeared in prestigious scientific journals such as Science, Journal of Virology, Virology, Retrovirology and Current HIV Research, Wu believes that a solution to the AIDS epidemic is possible. The 2009 NYCDC AIDS Ride (http://nycdc.org), which takes place in September, will support the next stage of Dr. Wu's research which has the potential to stop the HIV virus from becoming AIDS. Wu earned a doctorate in virology in 1998 from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, after spending four years studying the DNA replication of the baculovirus family — a group of viruses that are fatal to insects and are often used for nonchemical pest control. He subsequently served for four years as a research fellow at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) where he began examining HIV infection in humans prior to joining Mason’s faculty in 2003. Wu has been the recipient of many awards and honors including the 2007 "Tomorrow's PIs" by Genome Technology Magazine, the 2006 Siemens Mentor Award by the Siemens Foundation, and the 2003 NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence by NIH. His research interests include HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells and lentiviral vector development for targeting HIV infection.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

  • First
  • Previous
  • 1
  • 2