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Media Sources Guide

CATEGORY: Health CareClear

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Ancha Baranova

Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular and Microbiology

Expertise: Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, Liver Disease, Hepatitis C, Translational Medicine

Baranova is an associate professor in the Department of Molecular and Microbiology. She is working in collaboration with researchers at Inova Fairfax Hospital on several projects related to metabolic syndrome, diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatitis C and is hopeful that this research will eventually lead to the development of prognostic biomarkers. Baranova holds a doctorate from Moscow State University. Her research interests include molecular pathways in human tissues with an emphasis on cancer and metabolic diseases, computational and comparative genomics. She is using a systems biology approach to the functional genomics and pathways analysis of complex human disorders.

 

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Andrew Carle

Assistant Professor, and Director, Program in Assisted Living/Senior Housing Administration

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Expertise: Senior Housing and Care, Assisted Living, Long-Term Care, Retirement Communities

Andrew Carle is an internationally recognized expert on senior housing and care. He has written extensively about, and presented nationally and internationally on, the best models of Alzheimer’s care including the 1950s inspired Waveny Care Center in New Canaan, Connecticut. Carle conducts research related to the quality of housing options for seniors and designed the Alzheimer’s facilities for a national “Top 10” assisted living provider. According to Carle, more than one-third of the nation’s 40,000 assisted living and continuing care retirement communities offer some type of Alzheimer’s care. However, families considering such housing need to know what to look for in terms of staffing, programming and facility design.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Robin Couch

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Expertise: Therapeutics for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

Robin Couch is a research scientist who is investigating the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Couch is currently evaluating the effectiveness of neuroprotection, which involves the use of neurotrophins, or molecules naturally produced by resident cells in the brain, to defend the brain cells from death. This includes nerve growth factor which is a specific neurotrophin that binds to brain cells and promotes their survival. His other research interests include isoprene biosynthesis, personalized medicine and anti-cholesterol therapeutics.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Jane Flinn

Director, Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience

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Expertise: Role of Metals in Alzheimer’s Disease

Jane Flinn is examining the role of metals, particularly zinc, iron and copper, in the brain tissue of Alzheimer’s patients. She is also studying the effects of metal levels in drinking water on behavior and on plaque development. Flinn, who holds a doctorate in psychology from George Washington University and a doctorate in physics from Oxford University, has long been focused on the biological bases of learning and memory. She recently completed a study — conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey — that focuses on the effects of enhanced zinc on spatial memory and plaque formation in transgenic (or genetically modified) mice.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

Cara Frankenfeld

Assistant Professor, Department of Global and Community Health

Expertise: Chronic Disease, Diet, Cancer, Illness, Public Health, Epidemiology, Environment, Women’s Health

Cara Frankenfeld is an assistant professor of epidemiology in the Department of Global and Community Health.  Her work seeks to understand the way that diet, environment, and our host bacteria interact to affect human health.  She is also working on how we measure diet and in the relationship between dietary flavonoids and isoflavonoids (particular compounds in fruits, vegetables, and soy and other legumes) and chronic conditions. 

 

She is a member of the American College of Epidemiology, the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the American Society for Nutrition.

 

Frankenfeld completed a M.S. in Nutritional Sciences at the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at the University of Washington, where she studied the relationship between markers of intestinal bacteria profile and postmenopausal breast cancer risk factors.  In addition to this main area of study, she also worked on projects evaluating the validity of food frequency questionnaires, footwear and fall risk in the elderly, and risk factors for meningioma.  She completed post-doctoral work at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the National Cancer Institute.   She has also provided consulting expertise in the areas of environmental and occupational epidemiology, including dioxins, asbestos, and electric and magnetic fields. 

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Naomi Lynn Gerber

Professor and Director, Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability

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Expertise: Chronic Illness, Fatigue, Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Dr. Gerber is the director of Mason’s Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability. In this capacity, she is responsible for developing a research program to help describe the mechanisms by which disease produces disability and explore treatments that can prevent or reduce disabilities and restore function. She is board certified in internal medicine, rheumatology and PM&R. Dr. Gerber previously served as Chief, Rehabilitation Medicine Department (RMD), in the Clinical Center of National Institutes of Health. Under her supervision, in collaboration with the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, RMD developed a state of the art, program driven research section which studies human movement. Dr. Gerber is on staff at the National Rehabilitation Hospital (NRH) and ran a teaching clinic on foot management as part of a bilateral agreement between NIH & NRH. Much of her clinical research interest has been centered on measuring and treating impairments and disability in patients with musculoskeletal deficits; in particular, children with osteogenesis imperfecta, and persons with rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Her collaborative work has focused on studying pathomechanics and how patients with a variety of disorders compensate for impairments to preserve function. Dr. Gerber, who was recently elected to the Institute of Medicine, has authored/co-authored 90 peer reviewed, published manuscripts and 45 Chapters in major textbooks (Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Cancer, Rehabilitation et al.). She graduated from Smith College, Magna Cum Laude, Tufts University School of Medicine; and received medical training at the New England Medical Center, fellowship in rheumatology at NIH and residency training in PM&R at George Washington University.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Patrick Gillevet

Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy

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Expertise: Molecular Environmental Biology, Bioinformatics, Molecular Evolution, Genomics, Crohn’s Disease, Breast Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Cirrhosis of the Liver and HIV

Gillevet has been the lead scientist at the Environmental Biocomplexity and Ecology group at George Mason University since 1996. This group focuses on using state-of-the-art molecular techniques to study problems in molecular environmental sciences and genomic evolution. Gillevet is also the director of Mason’s new MicroBiome Analysis Center where he and his team of researchers are studying bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa within the human body. The effect of these organisms on human health will be a major focus of research at the center where investigators will explore microbial imbalances on or within the gut, mouth, respiratory tract and urinary and reproductive systems.

Prior to joining Mason, Gillevet was the technical director of the University of Illinois’ Center for Prokaryotic Genome Analysis from 1988 to 1990 and served as the director of Harvard University’s Harvard Genome Laboratory from 1990 to 1993. He established an integrated fluorescent sequencing facility at the National Center for Human Genome Research from 1993 to 1996. Gillevet holds a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Manitoba. His research interests include molecular environmental biology, molecular evolution, genomics, Crohn’s Disease, and bioinformatics.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Pamela M. Greenwood

Associate Professor of Psychology

Expertise: Genetics of Cognitive Aging, Cognitive Aspects of Alzheimer’s Disease

Pamela Greenwood uses behavioral, genetic and computational methods to investigate the cognitive sciences. Her overall goal is to find ways to identify older individuals who are likely to remain healthy and those who are likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease. Her research focuses on genes which regulate both normal cognitive aging and abnormal cognitive aging. She looks for effects of gene-to-gene interactions on cognitive aging, notably genes associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, including the Apolipoprotein E gene and neurotransmission genes. Greenwood serves as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging Special Emphasis Panels and for the National Science Foundation’s Cognitive Neuroscience Program.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Andrew Guccione

Professor and Chair, Department of Rehabilitation Science

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Expertise: Rehabilitation, geriatrics, Physical Therapy, exercise, physical activity in the older adult


Dr. Guccione was appointed the founding chair of the newly created Department of Rehabilitation Science in 2011. He joined Mason from the Department of Veterans Affairs, where he was deputy director of Health Services Research and Development Service in the Office of Research and Development. Prior to that, Dr. Guccione spent 10 years as senior vice president in the Division of Practice and Research at the American Physical Therapy Association.

 

His research interests are in geriatrics, health status measurement and functional outcomes after rehabilitation.  In addition to authoring or co-authoring over 25 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, he was the recipient of a Special Emphasis Research Career Award from the National Institute on Aging.

 

He is a licensed physical therapist and his clinical practice has centered mainly on geriatrics and musculoskeletal impairment in older adults. He is the editor of a textbook, Geriatric Physical Therapy, now in its third edition.

 

Dr. Guccione holds a doctor of physical therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. He received his PhD in sociology and a certificate in gerontological studies from Boston University.  He also holds a master’s degree in philosophy from Temple University and a master’s in physical therapy from Boston University. 

Dr. Guccione is well versed as a clinician and as a researcher to discuss physical rehabilitation to restore functional abilities after injury or illness as well as how the science of rehabilitation, particularly around exercise and physical activity, is critical to the prevention of functional decline as we age.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu

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Jack Hadley

Professor and Senior Health Services Researcher

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Expertise: Health Administration and Policy, Universal Health Care, Medicare, Medical Education Financing, Health Systems

Hadley is a professor and senior health services researcher in the Department of Health Administration and Policy. Hadley received a B.A. in economics from Brandeis University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University in 1975. He previously served as a principal research associate with The Urban Institute's Health Policy Center and a senior fellow at the Center for Studying Health System Change. His prior positions include professor and director of the Institute for Health Care Research and Policy at Georgetown University, board member and president of AcademyHealth, and editor of Inquiry. Hadley has conducted extensive research related to the financing and costs of care used by the uninsured, as well as the scope of health insurance coverage, medical education financing, and the effects of managed care on health delivery systems. Much of his work has analyzed large databases such as national household and physician surveys, Medicare claims and national hospital data in order to understand patient, provider, and system responses to policy changes. Currently, Hadley's research focuses primarily on issues related to costs and efficiency in the Medicare program. He is also conducting a study in conjunction with the National Cancer Institute that will investigate methodological issues in using observational data to evaluate the outcomes of alternative cancer treatments for elderly patients.

Media Contact: Michele McDonald, 703-993-8781, mmcdon15@gmu.edu